Hoarding Behaviors Package

Hoarding Behaviors - How to Work Effectively with Clients

Hoarding is serious and costly problem for everyone impacted by it whether that is the individual, family members, a landlord or a city. The goal of this series of training is to introduce participants to the problem and to teach specialized skills that will make you more effective on the job.

movingboxes

Courses in this package are:

Harm Reduction

Motivational Interviewing

Intensive De-Cluttering Techniques: Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques

Working One-on-One with Clients

Harm Reduction

Hoarding is serious and costly problem for everyone impacted by it whether that is the individual, family members, a landlord or a city. The goal of this package is to introduce participants to the problem and to teach specialized skills that will make you more effective on the job.

Denial is an uphill battle that makes helping someone address his or her hoarding behaviors extremely difficult. Hoarding is compared to other addictive behaviors and getting an individual to the point of acknowledging that there is a problem can be just as challenging as getting someone to acknowledge a problem with alcohol or drugs.

The focus of Harm Reduction is on getting past the denial of the problem. The workshop presents harm reduction as an alternative to treatment for severe hoarding. Harm reduction assumes that it is not necessary to stop all acquiring or to clear homes completely in order to reduce the risk of harm and improve the health, safety, and comfort of adults who hoard. The workshop presents the essential features of the harm reduction process applied to the problem of severe hoarding. The workshop presents strategies for engaging the client in the harm reduction process, building and managing the harm reduction team, assessing harm potential, and developing and managing a harm reduction plan.

Motivational Interviewing

One of the most frustrating and demoralizing features of hoarding disorder for clinicians is the steadfast refusal of those with the condition to accept help. Whether the help is in the form of cognitive-behavior therapy, self-help groups, or a focus on harm reduction, clinicians inevitably face reluctance and refusal; anger and push back. At the same time, people who hoard face significant health and safety risks and one out of three with hoarding disorder face imminent eviction from their residences. Engaging People Who Hoard: Motivational Interviewing Strategies and Techniques is a daylong workshop that presents the key principles and strategies of motivational interviewing and its application to people with hoarding behavior. The

workshop will include didactic and video instruction, as well as many opportunities to practice motivational interviewing through small-group exercises and role-plays.

Intensive De-Cluttering Techniques: Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques Working One-on-One with Clients

The use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques (CBT) has long been considered the gold standard in the treatment of hoarding disorder. The four-year joint study between University of California San Francisco, led by Dr. Carol Mathews, and MHA established that these techniques are effective when used by non-clinicians working with individuals dealing with hoarding behaviors.

Since it was first published in 2006, Buried in Treasures by Tolin, Steketee and Frost has been used very effectively with groups. This three-day course teaches participants the techniques discussed in Buried in Treasures and applies them to work done one-on-one, service provider to client. The course first lays a foundation for understanding hoarding behaviors. Tools and techniques are then presented that can be included in their work addressing hoarding behaviors. Learning will be reinforced through exercises and case studies. There will also be an opportunity for participants to discuss cases that are currently active. The course is appropriate for anyone needing to learn CBT techniques for use in their work with clients dealing with hoarding issues.

Comments are closed.